Help with Separation. please.

Discussion in 'Air Force Info' started by strange, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. strange

    strange New Member

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    I'm going to try to make this as short as i can.

    Basically, I want to separate as fast as possible while still maintaining my g.i bill.
    I've been in three years, I have three left. My job is Vehicle maintenance. I'm attached to a combat com unit. I've received 5's on all my EPR's.

    I've recently applied for VSIP (voluntary separation incentive program). However our chief said no one is getting out of our unit. At the very least I would like to palace chase back home, however deploying is not something i want to do again but I'd be willing to compensate. I have an appointment with the 1st shirt to talk about separation within the near future.

    I have many reasons to get out however none of them are AF approved. Not to put my business out there but here are a few:

    1. My grandma whom I was very close to/grew up with has been diagnosed with Dementia and her time is soon to come. (this does not qualify for hardship because my release would not cure her).
    2. Very eager to become a full time college student and get started on what I actually want to do in life, rather than waiting around for 3 more years. (i'm aware i can take classes using my TA, but i'm not interested in that.)
    3. Fiance lives back home.

    I'm aware the AF is trying to downsize, so why would you keep somebody in who truly does not want to be in? Is there anything else I can do to get out while maintaining my G.I. bill.

    Thank you for your time Please help.
  2. gunmate1

    gunmate1 PEB Forum Regular Member

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    See what the policies I the AF might be for Seperation for education. I am not familiar with the AF. Or else I could help more. But see what there is. Hardship has nothing to do with a cure the relative has to have raised you can get a hardship for grand am grand pa or uncles or aunts unless they raised you. But check with the regulations in the air force to see what you could do legally. Hope this helps a little.
  3. strange

    strange New Member

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    Your quick response if much appreciated. However she did not single handily raise me, my mom was there too however we did live on the same property for quite some time.

    I will definitely check into the regulations, I suppose I could find them on Epubs. I'll look.
  4. 808svt

    808svt PEB Forum Regular Member

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    Not to sound like an ass but this board is for members with health issues. If you are just looking for a way to get out of the contract you signed you may be looking in the wrong place.
  5. gunmate1

    gunmate1 PEB Forum Regular Member

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    Strange i have to agree with 808 SVT i didn't mention it when i wrote the post yesterday but this is for people with Legitimate Medical Issues. Remember and like 808 i am not trying to sound like an ass. You signed a contract to join, no one forced you. If i were you honestly if those are the only issues you have you only have 3 years left on your hitch, finish them and then get out. "I don't want to be here anymore" Is a rather poor excuse. You signed the contract.
  6. TSgt Twitch

    TSgt Twitch PEB Forum Regular Member

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    Its also a board of people being forced to separate and a board of tons of guys who know a lot more about rules and regulations. Whereas i agree none of the aforementioned reasons are what most of us would consider "viable" and most would consider them typical whiny airman rants, I learned after putting some 100+ kids on active duty while I was a volunteer recruiter and further learned in my years that really "our life" is not for everyone. He did state legally get out and not ask for ways around it like if he failed his PT test 4 times would he get to keep his gi bill etc.

    Right now it seems your only non-disciplanary/administrative/failure to adapt methods would be VSIP/Palace chase/palace front. if your grandmother raised you for atleast 5 yrs cumulative during your life and you oculd legally state that, a humanitarian reassignment could be the case, or even voluntary reassignment, But it is my guess that you are tired of playing grown up and want to go back into a lower gear to change directions. ( not an insult just a view) but please keep in mind that, being married costs money, supporting a family costs money etc. I recently had a troop who was married mil to mil and neither wanted to be "lifers" in the AF. He was an awesoem troop and they lived off his income alone and banked every dime of hers for 6 years, got out bought a house with cash, and are both going to college. I'd suggest you take soem leave to see your g-ma before things get to the point she can't remember your name as that and being there seeing the daily deterioration of someone with alzheimer's/dementia is the most painful part. investigate your fiancee moving out with you. and spending the next three years using ta to burn through as much college you can and banking every single dime you can for the future. after 6 yrs you should be an e-5, have atleast your associates, years of experience in a trade you can fall back on if college doesn't work out, and hopefully we can get some leadership in Washington that can turn this boat around and you might actually be able to find a job for what you wanna be when you grow up.

    Your post may receive some bad replies, please keep in mind many of us wannabe "lifers" have struggled for years trying to fight to hang onto our careers and finish our contracts that we signed and adhere to the oath's we took. many of us have pushed our bodies to the point of no return to support our brothers/sisters in arms on multiple deployments, fighting to hang onto our family and our careers.

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