Right hip tilted forward/right leg shorter than the left

Discussion in 'Intro' started by cohen40, May 16, 2009.

  1. cohen40

    cohen40 PEB Forum Regular Member

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    I hurt my lower back during mobilization, and now, after I went to a chiropractor and got an x-ray--I have my right hip out of alignment (vertebral subluxation according to the chiro.). As a result of my misalignment, my right leg is shorter than my left. Is there anything I can do to aleviate this condition from re-occuring. I'm currently in Afghanistan, and I have about 3-months left of the deployment. Should I be on any kind of profile? I am a gunner right now, and every time we leave the wire, my lower back kills me. Any recommendations or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. When I was in BAF going on leave, the orthopedic physical therapist cracked me back to normal but that was several months ago; my hip/leg started to shorten up after about 2 weeks back at my fob. Just carrying my SAW slinged causes pain. Don't mean to sound like a wimp, but if it hurts and is messing my body up, what else can I do. The Dr. at our FOB asked me if I could limp it out for a few months till demob, and I told him I'm pretty sure I can. What kind of profile should I have for this condition? I go back to the Dr. on Monday and he's gonna put me on a temporary profile till Aug. Just curious as to what I should expect. Thanks.
     
  2. Jason Perry

    Jason Perry Benevolent Leader Site Founder Staff Member PEB Forum Veteran

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    cohen40,

    Welcome, good to have you here!

    The profile series and codes are explained in this extract from AR 40-501: Physical Evaluation Board Forum - PEB Library - AR 40-501 Profile Series and Codes

    I don't have any insight on the medical issue of alleviating pain/condition, that is one for the docs.

    How severe is the difference in length?

    Be wary of not getting this addressed before you "demob" (which tells me your are a RC Soldier). It is a pervasive problem that they do not properly address your condition before you leave active duty, and the unit or State does not process you properly. Unless there are really extenuating circumstances, it is almost always in your interest to stay on active duty to address medical issues.

    Best of luck!
     
  3. Chinook

    Chinook PEB Forum Veteran

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    cohen40,

    Like Jason said, you need to get your docs input. your back probably hurts because you are way out of alignment. My hip is tilted as well, and my right leg is turned in. It hurts. :)

    You don't sound like a whimp. Back / hip pain is very real and very debilitating. You need to be sure to get checked out again.

    There are a lot of conditions that cause sublaxations. Everyone talks about core strength..(bla bla bla) we all know that by now...but there are other things like, piriformis syndrome, and some other stuff that is all treatable with phys therapy, sometimes hip belts, and lots of other stuff.

    Make sure you get seen by your doc out there....and get copies of each appt you go to out there, even if its just the med techs or whatever. You need proof you're hurt while you're there. :)

    I hope you get relief soon.
     
  4. robs42

    robs42 Moderator

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    you deffinately are not a wimp. infact i think that people who don't have back pain are wimps:D. seriously though...get that s#!t addresses and keep getting it addressed. i kept tuffing it out and it only made me worse. especially after my 1'st surgery. my friend did the same thing w/his foot. i really believe that if we hadn't tuffed it out, we'd be ALOT better off then we are today.
     
  5. franky

    franky PEB Forum Veteran

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    Cohen40,


    Everyone is different, but here are a couple of things that helped me out when I was in that situation. My Physical Therapist would reset my SI joint which would help for a short period of time but again it did help. Also, try to stretch as often as you can as best as you can. The use of ice was another release (short period of time). I am not a Doc but these are some of the things that helped me out when I was deployed. Continue to seek medial attention for your stated issues and make sure they are noted in your medical records, for your future, health, and lively hood. Good luck, stay safe, and take care of your health.
     

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