CRDP for "20 Good Years" reserve time but MEB while on active duty

TigerScan2000

Registered Member
Hello Group,

I would like to post a question that may have already been posted and answered. If so, please forgive me.

I am a reservest with "20 Good Years".

I am currently on Mobilization Stateside and in a WTU.

I have received MED / PEB and VA ratings as follows:

Milittary: 80%
VA: 80%

Now, I am being medically retired while on active duty and not as a reservest. The disablities are service connected but not combat related, So i know the CRSC does not apply.

With the 20 years of reserve time, will I qualify for CRDP or will I get only one Benefit check from either Military or VA (which ever is greater)

Thanks for all Advive,

SFC Tiger
 

nwlivewire

PEB Forum Veteran
Yep. You will qualify for CRDP.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong here, but CRDP kicks in at age 60 - UNLESS you have qualifying time on or after 28 JAN, 2008, that will reduce your having to wait to age 60.

I do know that medical hold orders - WTU - CB-WTU - orders count toward the "early retirement" before age 60 for CRDP.
Look on your orders, Near the bottom of your orders, look for a finance/accounting codes. There are a bunch of them!

If you see the numbers - 12301(h) - then all this time counts toward earlier than age 60 for CRDP. So do mobilization orders on or after 28 JAN, 2008.

I know there are other types of time that will count towards reducing your age 60, too.

Just can't think what they are.

v/r,
nwlivewire
 

TigerScan2000

Registered Member
Thanks for the reply. However, this is where I get confused.

I am on active duty now. They have offered me Active Duty retirement based on my disability. I can begin "drawing" it as soon as I come off active duty. My Retirement is no longer based on points. So, if I take the Active duty retirement will I have to give up the VA benefits.

If the CRDP does not kick in until I am 60. Then how do they go back and refigure a reserve retirement.

This would make sense if I was just a regular "drilling" reservest being MEB.

The confusion is that while on active duty, They have to treat me as a "active duty" soldier.

Sorry If I am not making too much sense.

Thanks
SFC Tiger
 

nwlivewire

PEB Forum Veteran
I'm in the same boat you're in. A NG Soldier on AD, going through the boards. You're a Reserve Soldier going through the boards. Same thing.

That's how it got explained to me.

Your disability retirement is based on your AD base pay, generally computed these days on the "high three year" average. That is usually more than your NG retirement would be anyway.

Get your Reserve Retirement Points Statement and you'll see what I mean.

So essentially, you are receiving retirement pay due to disabilities before age 60.

Because you have a twenty-year letter, when you turn age 60, that would have NORMALLY been the age you would have been retired at and collected your Reserve retirement, had you not disability retired earlier. And, at age 60, you would have also been eligible for CRDP.

So we can collect CRDP at age 60 - or sooner, if you have the qualifying time to collect CRDP before age 60.

If you do a search on this website under CRDP, you'll find lots of info on this.

Lucky for you that you have a 20-year letter. That's a key piece to qualifying for CRDP. If you had 20 AD years - or 7200 points (get a copy of your RPAS)- you would get CRDP right away.

Your Reserve Letter lets you in for CRDP at age 60 - without 7200 points.

*************
CRSC - A DIFFERENT PROGRAM THAN CRDP

If your disabilities are combat/combat-related, you would qualify for CRSC - a different program altogether - and would be due this immediately at retirement.

Look on your copy of the DA FORM 199, the form that lists your disabilities with their corresponding disability percentage ratings. The form you signed after you agreed with the PEB findings and turned back into your PEBLO.

Go down to BLOCK 10 on that form. If it says 10A/C, then the Army gave you combat/combat related.

You would qualify for that immediately as there is no age 60 thing on CRSC.

If you qulaify for CRSC, then YOU have to apply for it through the ARMY as soon as you discharge with your DD 214. It is NOT automatically given.

*******************

If you fall under different types of retirement calculations ("high three" AND Reserve Retirement), Finance has to award you the highest of the two. Generally, though not always, a disability retirement for NG/Reserve Soldiers undergoing the IDES process is higher than their Reserve retirement.

So get your Reserve retirement points statement (RPAS) out and see where you are on points and stuff. Make sure it's correct, too. I just had my RPAS updated as I found a year of points that wasn't on mine.

v/r, nwlivewire
 

mkpgoang

PEB Forum Regular Member
How is CRDP calculated for Res/Guard Chap 61 retiree at age 60? I have 27 years ANG (10yr AD), have 20 yr letter, retired Chap 61 from USAF, VA rated 100%. Currently offset for VA pay.

How will chap 61 offset at age 60? or, at age 60 with 20 good years will the offset be the difference between my LOS (10yr) retirement and the medical retirement (60%) from USAF?

I have read that when eligible for CRDP with 20 good years/age 60 my restored mil pay via CRDP will be capped by the LOS retirement amount which is lower than my medical retirement.

Also I have read in threads that when eligible for CRDP you simply receive your LOS retirement and you VA, which in my case I will have a small CRDP amount.:confused:
 

burnsls

PEB Forum Regular Member
Let me get this straight. I am a Reservist w/18.9 TAFMS and a 20-year letter but over 7300 total Reserve points. I am being medically retired at 100%. Does my 7300 points, which equals 20+ some good years, qualify me for CRDP now? I can't' find anything on the web that says I can recieve it before I turn 60. Thanks.
 

Rustysilverwings

PEB Forum Regular Member
I'm same situation. 26 yrs service, O4, 100% VA, 75% AF disability w/"Instrumentality of War"

My understanding is you have two choices: First, accept the VA plus whatever (if any) your AD medical disability retirement is over that, or
Two: accept the VA plus your Reserve retirement/CDRP calculation based on point/LOS/grade, which is likely to be lower for most traditional Reserve Component members.

Reserve Component medical retirees cannot get the full VA and their full CDRP/military retirement based on % of disability, but we get generally the best deal with the first option
 

nwlivewire

PEB Forum Veteran
OK. Here is a scenario and some thoughts/questions.

SM has 20 year retirement letter from NG and if they were 60 right this minute, they would receive 1442 p/mth from NG retirement.

NG SM went through IDES process and rec'd rating of 70% from Army, and 100% P&T from VA.
Non-combat/non-combat-related findings (that finding, and the potential CRSC issue related to it, is for another thread).

It is my understanding, under the above scenario, is that if the NG SM is UNDER the age of 60 without qualifying time for an earlier age retirement, the SM would receive, at the IDES discharge, a combined total monthly disability amount of VA and IDES disability % - BUT, the monthly amount is not to exceed the higher SINGLE amount of either one of the two.

EX: for me, my Army disability (PDRL) is set at 3371 p/mth (E-7 at max pay & under "Final Pay" system) . Under age 60 - no CRSC. My VA is set to begin after discharge at 2769. I will want to elect to have my TAXABLE Army pay of 3371 off-set and take the VA money as that is non-taxable.

So, when I subtract the ARMY PDRL from the VA I will get a MINUS of 602. THAT 602 is what I will then receive from the ARMY for my monthly PDRL. 2769 plus 602 = 3371. 3371 was my original 70% disability rating and monthly amount from the Army. Since that 70% amount will exceed my VA amount, the Army will pay me the difference. But my combined monthly total disability amount will not and cannot exceed 3371 per month, which is the original higher amount as per Congressional law.

So for me, until I hit age 60, I will be locked into the combined VA amount (non-taxable) and the Army PDRL leftover amount (taxable).

**********

Now comes my thoughts and questions....

Remember, I have a 20-year letter from the NG, so I am eligible for their retirement amount at age 60. If I was old enough to retire today, the NG letter says I would receive 1442 p/month.

So, my question is, when I turn age 60, how is my reitrement affected by that NG retirement figure? Trying to calculate this is for the age 60 scenario is what I am not sure of.

THOUGHTS

I suspect that my VA will remain the same, but I THINK my retirement will change to my NG retirement. So I MIGHT get my VA & NG retirement.

Or, will I get my VA plus the full Army retirement, but the ARMY total cannot exceed the NG 20 year letter amount?

Or, does DFAS award the GREATER of the two combined - either the VA plus 70% Army, or the VA plus NG? Whichever is higher?

QUESTION 2:

I read in the older version of the NDAA 2011 that those SMs that did time in the WTUs, both WTU CADRE AND WTU IDES/Legacy Soldiers, that they ALL get credited for "time served" and that this time counts towards the early retirement before age 60 CRDP. Suppossedly, Congress made that change in the NDAA 2011 because from the 2008 NDAA thru the NDAA 2011, ONLY the WTU CADRE was being credited for early retirement CRDP. Suppossedly, the NDAA 2011 changed this.

However, every military website I've come across either says this is not true, or, the websites completely ignore this issue. Need clarification on this. Did this NDAA 2011 language get removed?

************

QUESTION 3

What about burnsls here on this thread? Given his situation, how is his retirement calculated? Is there a future retirement change in store for him?

v/r,
nwlivewire
 

maparker

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Here is what CRDP laws says on the issue (10 USC 1414). Not knowing the details of sections 1405 or 12732 I can't say for sure but I believe 7200+ points qualifies one for immediate CRDP if drawing retirement pay be it for length of service or disability.

Mike

(b) Special Rules for Chapter 61 Disability Retirees.— (1) Career retirees.— The retired pay of a member retired under chapter 61 of this title with 20 years or more of service otherwise creditable under section 1405 of this title, or at least 20 years of service computed under section 12732 of this title, at the time of the member’s retirement is subject to reduction under sections 5304 and 5305 of title 38, but only to the extent that the amount of the member’s retired pay under chapter 61 of this title exceeds the amount of retired pay to which the member would have been entitled under any other provision of law based upon the member’s service in the uniformed services if the member had not been retired under chapter 61 of this title.

(2) Disability retirees with less than 20 years of service.— Subsection (a) does not apply to a member retired under chapter 61 of this title with less than 20 years of service otherwise creditable under section 1405 of this title, or with less than 20 years of service computed under section 12732 of this title, at the time of the member’s retirement.
 

J_Ripley

Registered Member
Seems to be a lot of questions going around dealing with CRDP.

I received my 20 year letter from Human Resources Command (HRC) in 2002.
I was in the Army Reserves from 1976 until I was medically retired on 29 January 2013.
I was on active duty from 5 September 2005 until I was medically retired on 29 January 2013.
My Proposed rating from VA was 90%, but while on active duty had a heart stent procedure done and was placed on oxygen tanks on August 31, 2012 which records was submitted by the chief of VA counselors at Fort Bragg and sent to VA. So expect VA to up the 90 to 100% and the PEBLO refused to submit an amendment to the PEB.

Talked to DFAS and was told it was up to each branch of service to submit a Memo to DFAS for those that served on active duty from January 2008 forward and has a 20 year letter in order to obtain CRDP prior to age 60. Later confirmed by the Chief of Retirement Services at Fort Bragg and also by e-mail from the AW2 counselor.

When I called HRC, I relayed what DFAS stated, Chief of CRDP at DFAS stated, and what the AW2 Counselor stated. I then brought up Public Law 110-181 Section 647 which was otherwise known as the National Defense Authorization Act of 2008, also H.R. 6523 Section 633 which meant time in the WTB did count towards the reduction from the age 60, and section 635.

I received the following e-mail from HRC:


Thank you for your recent inquiry to the Army Human Resource Command (HRC) in reference to CRDP eligibility.

The CRDP program is managed by DFAS and Concurrent Receipt is automatic, HRC does not assist with the decision making criteria for the CRDP program.

If you require further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact HRC at: Toll Free: 1-888-276-9472 (888-ARMYHRC), via email: [email protected].

The Human Resource Command thanks you for the opportunity to address your concerns. We would also like to convey our appreciation and gratitude for your selfless service to the Army and our Nation.

Very Respectfully,
Customer Care Representative
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Human Resource Command

The chief of Retirement Services at Fort Bragg received a copy of a Memo that was done by the Air Force to assist their Reserve and Guard personnel that qualified with a 20 year letter and active duty time from January 28, 2008 from the chief of CRDP at DFAS. When the chief of Retirement Services contacted HRC to try to get someone to take ownership of it, HRC so far has refused. They are going by the automatic at age 60 and ignore the 20 year letter and the active duty time from January 28, 2008 forward.

I have notified the Department of the Army Inspector General's Office, and sent to Senator Richard Burr and Senator Kay Hagan along with all the attachments, copies of the Congressional documents that were Sections 647, 633 and 635, my 20 year letter and all the DD 214s where I have been on active duty from 5 September 2005 until I was medically retired on 29 January 2013. I have not received a single response yet.

Is this issue going to need an attorney to file with the United States Court of Federal Claims as was done in the Sabo vs. United States on December 22, 2011 or has those sections been revoked???? If it does take an attorney, what kind of specialized attorney and who do I contact????

Help will be appreciated.

Thank you.
 

Attachments

J_Ripley

Registered Member
The Chief of Retirement Services RSO) at Fort Bragg notified me that he finally got in touch with the Chief of Transition Services at HRC, in turn gave the a point of contact of a person at HRC, and was in final agreement with DFAS. They took the copy of the Memo created by the Air Forces and should know by Friday on how HRC is going to resolve the issue to where it will not happen again to future Guard and Reserves SMs that fall below the age 60 criteria.
 

J_Ripley

Registered Member
In my and 9 others cases, the CRDP issue with the reduced retirement age qualifications are getting solved. The attached information paper will help others in this issue on the Army side, and assist those of the Naval and Marine Corps reserves who also faces the same issue.
 

Attachments

Cheri

Registered Member
In my and 9 others cases, the CRDP issue with the reduced retirement age qualifications are getting solved. The attached information paper will help others in this issue on the Army side, and assist those of the Naval and Marine Corps reserves who also faces the same issue.
Joe, Was your CRDP issue completely resolved?
 

Cheri

Registered Member
In my and 9 others cases, the CRDP issue with the reduced retirement age qualifications are getting solved. The attached information paper will help others in this issue on the Army side, and assist those of the Naval and Marine Corps reserves who also faces the same issue.
Joseph, Thank You for this Clear and Concise Informational Letter concerning CRDP and U.S. Reserve and National Guard Veterans who qualify for both the CRDP because they were rated 50% or higher disability by the VA and the Reduction in Age (Early Age Drop) for Veterans who were mobilized in support of Contingency Operations from January 2008 and forward.
 

gsfowler

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Cheri, here is the process for CRDP for Army Resrvists/National Guard

https://www.hrc.army.mil/tagd/reduced age retirement

The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2008 enacted the Reduced Retirement Age for Reserve Component (RC) Soldiers based on Active Duty (AD) performance.

The NDAA for 2008 reduces the retirement age for Reserve Component (RC) Soldiers from 60 to a lesser age, but not below age 50, for those who have served on Active Duty (AD) in an eligible status on or after 29 Jan 08. For qualifying service on or after 29 Jan 08, each day on that AD tour could count toward a reduction in retirement age. However, even though each day counts, days are credited in aggregates of 90 days only within any Fiscal Year. A day of duty shall be included in only one aggregate of 90 days.

In order to ensure each Soldier receives proper credit, it is incumbent upon the Soldier to maintain supporting documentation, which includes: Department of Defense (DD) Forms 214 (Certificate of Release or Discharge From AD), and DD Forms 220 (AD Report) for periods of AD less than 90 days. For periods of AD not covered by DD Forms 214 or 220, copies of your Leave and Earning Statements with your mobilization orders will suffice. Orders alone are not proof of duty performed, but merely an authorizing document.

AD, for this purpose, means service pursuant to a call or order to AD on orders specifying, as the authority for such orders, a provision of law referred to in section 101(a) (13)(B), and performed under section 688, 12301 (a), 12302, 12304, 12305, 12406, and chapter 15 (insurrection), or under section 12301 (d) of Title 10 USC. Active Guard Reserve (AGR) duty under section 12310 of Title 10 USC, will not be included as service on active duty for determining eligibility for reduced age retired pay for non-regular service.

Active service includes service on AD as defined in subparagraph 6.5.2.2 of DoDI 1215.07, and Full-time National Guard when under a call to active service by a governor and authorized by the President or the Secretary of Defense under section 502(f) or 115 and 502 (f) of Title 32 USC for purposes of responding to either a national emergency declared by the President or a national emergency supported by Federal funds.

Note that if a Soldier is wounded or otherwise injured or becomes ill while serving on AD pursuant to a call to order to AD under a provision of law mentioned above, and the member is then ordered to AD under section 12301 (h) (1) to receive medical care for the wound, injury, or illness, each day of AD under that order for medical care, shall be treated as a continuation of the original call or order to active duty for purposes of reducing the eligibility age of the member under NDAA 2008, Section 647.

The reduction of the minimum age for eligibility for retired pay for non-regular service does not reduce the age for eligibility for health care under 10 USC 1074 (b). The eligibility for health care will continue to be 60 years of age. Qualified Retired Reserve members under the age of 60 looking for TRICARE medical coverage may purchase TRICARE Retired Reserve (TRR). Once the retiree reaches age 60, the service member and qualifying family members become eligible for Tricare Standard, Extra and Prime (where available). See www.tricare.mil for additional information.

HRC sends out retirement applications to Soldiers at age 59. Since the NDAA is now in place, some members are eligible to start receiving pay before age 60. Attached is a calculator that you can use to determine/estimate when you are eligible to start receiving your retirement pay. If eligible to retire before you reach age 59, you can contact HRC for an application packet or download the forms from our website. You will need the DD Form 108 and DD Form 2656. Also on the website is AHRC Form 4001(Retirement Application). This form gives you instructions on completing the retirement application. Also include copies of your mobilization orders, your DD214 and the orders transferring you to the retired reserves.

Soldiers are required to submit verifying documents, such as copies of your mobilization orders and your DD214. Soldiers must also include orders placing them in the Retired Reserves. Additional implementing guidance may be obtained from the U.S. Army Human Resources Center of Excellence-Ft. Knox at: ATTN: AHRC-PDP-TR, 1600 Spearhead Division Avenue, Dept. 482, Ft. Knox, KY 40122-5402. Phone number: 1-888-276-9472 or (502) 613-8950.

http://www.timeanddate.com/date/duration.html

When calculating your time, you will run each fiscal year independently (key in each fiscal year separately running from OCT 1-SEP 30 or from the first day on AD within the fiscal year to the end of the fiscal year). Divide by 90 to get the full number of total qualifying periods for each fiscal year. In other words, you can take total days in a fiscal year, divide by 90 to get the qualifying periods for each fiscal year. Any days left over that are less than 90 within a fiscal year will not count. After you run all applicable fiscal years separately, you could take all qualifying periods from all fiscal years and add together for final number of qualifying periods towards 90 day drop. If you need assistance, contact HRC at the number above.
 

gsfowler

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Because there are so many rules regarding this, I went ahead and made my own packet up and sealed it, even though I have more than 10 years that I will have to wait to collect my early retirement.

The reason I did this is so that I would have it when the time comes, and not have to look for all of the documents. In addition to putting everything into an envelope, I also scanned it all into the could (hopefully it still exists in 10 years)
 

wavy4jc

Registered Member
Because there are so many rules regarding this, I went ahead and made my own packet up and sealed it, even though I have more than 10 years that I will have to wait to collect my early retirement.

The reason I did this is so that I would have it when the time comes, and not have to look for all of the documents. In addition to putting everything into an envelope, I also scanned it all into the could (hopefully it still exists in 10 years)
I'm in the same boat you're in. A NG Soldier on AD, going through the boards. You're a Reserve Soldier going through the boards. Same thing.

That's how it got explained to me.

Your disability retirement is based on your AD base pay, generally computed these days on the "high three year" average. That is usually more than your NG retirement would be anyway.

Get your Reserve Retirement Points Statement and you'll see what I mean.

So essentially, you are receiving retirement pay due to disabilities before age 60.

Because you have a twenty-year letter, when you turn age 60, that would have NORMALLY been the age you would have been retired at and collected your Reserve retirement, had you not disability retired earlier. And, at age 60, you would have also been eligible for CRDP.

So we can collect CRDP at age 60 - or sooner, if you have the qualifying time to collect CRDP before age 60.

If you do a search on this website under CRDP, you'll find lots of info on this.

Lucky for you that you have a 20-year letter. That's a key piece to qualifying for CRDP. If you had 20 AD years - or 7200 points (get a copy of your RPAS)- you would get CRDP right away.

Your Reserve Letter lets you in for CRDP at age 60 - without 7200 points.

*************
CRSC - A DIFFERENT PROGRAM THAN CRDP

If your disabilities are combat/combat-related, you would qualify for CRSC - a different program altogether - and would be due this immediately at retirement.

Look on your copy of the DA FORM 199, the form that lists your disabilities with their corresponding disability percentage ratings. The form you signed after you agreed with the PEB findings and turned back into your PEBLO.

Go down to BLOCK 10 on that form. If it says 10A/C, then the Army gave you combat/combat related.

You would qualify for that immediately as there is no age 60 thing on CRSC.

If you qulaify for CRSC, then YOU have to apply for it through the ARMY as soon as you discharge with your DD 214. It is NOT automatically given.

*******************

If you fall under different types of retirement calculations ("high three" AND Reserve Retirement), Finance has to award you the highest of the two. Generally, though not always, a disability retirement for NG/Reserve Soldiers undergoing the IDES process is higher than their Reserve retirement.

So get your Reserve retirement points statement (RPAS) out and see where you are on points and stuff. Make sure it's correct, too. I just had my RPAS updated as I found a year of points that wasn't on mine.

v/r, nwlivewire

nwlivewire, you are correct. I have just been through this with the RSO and HRC.

If a Reserve or NG servicemember HAS a 20 year letter, they will get CRDP. IF they have AD time after 29 JAN 2008, they will receive their pay BEFORE age 60 in 90-consecutive day blocks per FISCAL year (1 OCT to 30 SEP). ANY leftover days NOT in a 90-day block WILL NOT count.

I will give you an example (my case). I went on order 9 Jan 2009 and came off orders 16 AUG 2010. In fiscal 2009 (1 OCT 2008 to 30 Sep 2009), I served 258 days, BUT, they subtract 258 days from age 60. They will subtract ONLY 180 days or 2 blocks of 90-day periods...the left over 78 are not counted because it doesnt equal a 90-day block!! The rest of my orders, from 1 OCT 2009 to 16 AUG 2010, is 319 days, but only 270 (3 blocks of 90-consecutive days) will count toward the reduced age law (the remaining 49 days will not count because it is less than 90 days).

Since their are 5 (FIVE) 90-day blocks within the time I served on orders after 29 JAN 2008, I will receive my CRDP at 58 years and 9 months instead of getting it at 60!! I know, we all get short-changed to some degree because of that rule, but thats the law as it stands. In my case, I will get short-changed 127 days or about 4 months. All things considered, its not bad at all. At least the government did make provisions to be able to collect our full pay before reaching 60.

I wish you all the best!!

Ray Henning
USA RET
 

RonG

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
With regard to CRDP and CRSC:

CRSC can be received as a Chapter 61 retiree without waiting for age 60 (or earlier as discussed above).

Combat Related Special Compensation for Chapter 61 (disability) retirees is the lesser of

--a. the dollar amount of the longevity portion of the DoD retired pay

or

--b. the dollar amount of VA compensation for combat related disabilities. (Approved percentage mirrors the rates found in the VA compensation tables.)

Note: Active duty time is used to determine the longevity portion. Reservists can use their total career retired points and divide by 360 to determine the active duty equivalent factor. CRSC does not replace the disability portion of retired pay.

More info on CRSC: https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crsc.html

CRDP:
CRDP cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.


Selected qualification:
"you are a reserve retiree with 20 qualifying years of service, who has a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater and who has reached retirement age. (In most cases the retirement age for reservists is 60, but certain reserve retirees may be eligible before they turn 60. If you are a member of the Ready Reserve, your retirement age can be reduced below age 60 by three months for each 90 days of active service you have performed during a fiscal year.)"


https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crdp.html
 

wavy4jc

Registered Member
With regard to CRDP and CRSC:

CRSC can be received as a Chapter 61 retiree without waiting for age 60 (or earlier as discussed above).

Combat Related Special Compensation for Chapter 61 (disability) retirees is the lesser of

--a. the dollar amount of the longevity portion of the DoD retired pay

or

--b. the dollar amount of VA compensation for combat related disabilities. (Approved percentage mirrors the rates found in the VA compensation tables.)

Note: Active duty time is used to determine the longevity portion. Reservists can use their total career retired points and divide by 360 to determine the active duty equivalent factor. CRSC does not replace the disability portion of retired pay.

More info on CRSC: https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crsc.html

CRDP:
CRDP cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.


Selected qualification:
"you are a reserve retiree with 20 qualifying years of service, who has a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater and who has reached retirement age. (In most cases the retirement age for reservists is 60, but certain reserve retirees may be eligible before they turn 60. If you are a member of the Ready Reserve, your retirement age can be reduced below age 60 by three months for each 90 days of active service you have performed during a fiscal year.)"


https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crdp.html
Hi Ron, the poster asking about the CHP 61 retirement above was asking, when they reach 60, will they continue to get the Active Duty retirement pay, or, will they revert to the reserve/national guard retirement pay they would have been entitled to after reaching 60.

Answer: Whichever is greater.

In my case, I am 58 yrs old and receive VA (90% rating) and DFAS (50% rating) disability retirement pay. My Active Duty disability retirement that I am currently receiving will continue when I reach 60. I have already figured out that I would receive less if I were to receive Reserve Retirement pay when I reach 60. So, when I reach 60, the only difference in my pay will be I will get VA and full DFAS medical retirement pay. hope that helps
 
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