Gulf War Syndrome - Depression/Mental Illness in children

DAKSEA

Registered Member
#1
Hi I was wondering if there are any Desert Storm veterans that would be willing to share about their children's mental health, I'm a 21 year old who's father served in desert storm (1-8 Cav) who is dealing with major clinical depression, with a background of severe headaches, and I was wondering if anyone who was deployed during the first part of the war, has children aged 15 - 21 who are dealing with depression or chronic headaches that don't respond well to medication. Thanks for your time I know that there are a lot of studies that have been done, but it seems like most of them are related to birth defects, rather than mental illness later in their lives.
 

oddpedestrian

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#2
No, you cannot file a claim from what your father went through down range, other than specific birth defects that are supported with corroborating evidence primarily from AO exposure. The VA only has an obligation to provide treatment and compensation to Veterans, not freeloaders.
 

DAKSEA

Registered Member
#3
No sorry you misunderstand I'm not looking for any compensation, I'm looking for a into to specific units and areas of the Gulf War and if there's a link between that first era of Desert Storm/Shield veteran's children; and the rising rates of depression and suicide in kids today. It seems like you're upset with me, I love my dad and respect what all veterans went through, but calling me a freeloader really hurts, we all have our own battles to fight; but no one's problems are the same - I'll never know what you or my father went through personally and I respect that. I am not in the military, I always wanted to but the treatments (ECT) I'm receiving for my depression prevent that however I'm still passionate about the military and intend to study the Gulf War, I just needed some current information.
 

tony292

PEB Forum Veteran
#4
I understand what you are asking and going through. My father was a Vietnam vet and I’ve often wondered what kinds of things I could have inhereted from him because of it. I’m also a veteran and have mental health issues but nothing so far has traced back to him. He had pretty bad PTSD and I’ve got depression/anxiety and depending on which psychiatrist you ask I’ve eithe rgot bipolar or borderline personality disorder with Schizoid traits.

This mental shit is not fun!!!
 

gsfowler

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
#5
Hi I was wondering if there are any Desert Storm veterans that would be willing to share about their children's mental health, I'm a 21 year old who's father served in desert storm (1-8 Cav) who is dealing with major clinical depression, with a background of severe headaches, and I was wondering if anyone who was deployed during the first part of the war, has children aged 15 - 21 who are dealing with depression or chronic headaches that don't respond well to medication. Thanks for your time I know that there are a lot of studies that have been done, but it seems like most of them are related to birth defects, rather than mental illness later in their lives.
Mental health 101. Depression can be linked to the environment that you were raised under. There are also genetic dispositions.
 

DAKSEA

Registered Member
#6
Thank you for your replies, I've been doing some unguided research about the PB pill which my father told me to look into, and found some interesting things related to lifestyle and health choices. My dad was a medic withe 1st cav by the way and now he is a Physicians Assistant I just want to make sure he isn't suffering from anything unknown. I do think it has a lot of mental health today relates to the environment we were raised in and society is much different now than it was even 20 years ago (I would be 1). I know a lot of this research might have been done and I'm finding quite a few resources, but this would be occurring in veterans recently based on lifestyle changes. Any information to point me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.
 

Navy757

Registered Member
#7
Thank you for your replies, I've been doing some unguided research about the PB pill which my father told me to look into, and found some interesting things related to lifestyle and health choices. My dad was a medic withe 1st cav by the way and now he is a Physicians Assistant I just want to make sure he isn't suffering from anything unknown. I do think it has a lot of mental health today relates to the environment we were raised in and society is much different now than it was even 20 years ago (I would be 1). I know a lot of this research might have been done and I'm finding quite a few resources, but this would be occurring in veterans recently based on lifestyle changes. Any information to point me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.
Yes being called anything without knowing your full situation is uncalled for, and even in rare circumstances is name calling ever appropriate. Being a dependent of a service member has it battles and burdens that you never got a vote it. Especially the kids. (To make it clear I am not a dependent, but I have seen the very real struggles of my own, and as a father it does break my heart)The best advice I can give you is to ask your Dad if he is willing to, is to share his medical records with you. Share his military evaluations with you. Then you can be your best detective, see what MOS he held, what equipment he worked on, where and when he was deployed. Then cross reference that with known toxic exposures of materials, operations, elements, vaccines, etc. Then cross reference that with known studies from the CDC, NIH, or WHO with your symptoms. Because you are right a lot of toxic exposures DO get passed on through the male reproductive organs and damage YOUR DNA. This has been well documented and recently brought to light because of the Flint, Michigan Pb exposure. And there is solid science behind it from reputable organizations. Just don't get suck in to the conspiracy sites, stick with the hard sciences. Because I take your post as someone just looking for answers, trying to figure it out, why you feel shitty. And a father would never knowingly pass anything like that on to his kids. Hope this helps.
 

DAKSEA

Registered Member
#8
I understand what you are asking and going through. My father was a Vietnam vet and I’ve often wondered what kinds of things I could have inhereted from him because of it. I’m also a veteran and have mental health issues but nothing so far has traced back to him. He had pretty bad PTSD and I’ve got depression/anxiety and depending on which psychiatrist you ask I’ve eithe rgot bipolar or borderline personality disorder with Schizoid traits.

This mental shit is not fun!!!
Stay strong brother
Yes being called anything without knowing your full situation is uncalled for, and even in rare circumstances is name calling ever appropriate. Being a dependent of a service member has it battles and burdens that you never got a vote it. Especially the kids. (To make it clear I am not a dependent, but I have seen the very real struggles of my own, and as a father it does break my heart)The best advice I can give you is to ask your Dad if he is willing to, is to share his medical records with you. Share his military evaluations with you. Then you can be your best detective, see what MOS he held, what equipment he worked on, where and when he was deployed. Then cross reference that with known toxic exposures of materials, operations, elements, vaccines, etc. Then cross reference that with known studies from the CDC, NIH, or WHO with your symptoms. Because you are right a lot of toxic exposures DO get passed on through the male reproductive organs and damage YOUR DNA. This has been well documented and recently brought to light because of the Flint, Michigan Pb exposure. And there is solid science behind it from reputable organizations. Just don't get suck in to the conspiracy sites, stick with the hard sciences. Because I take your post as someone just looking for answers, trying to figure it out, why you feel shitty. And a father would never knowingly pass anything like that on to his kids. Hope this helps.
Thank you that helps a lot i think that would be the correct path to take, and I actually just found out that one of my friend's dad was also in 1st cav who might have been deployed at the same time as my dad and he and I have similar personalities which got me thinking, I'll see if he can talk to his dad but I don't think they're very close. I've also been worried about my dad as lately hes been going through some health issues and I love him and don't want him suffering from something unknowingly. I have been staying away from those conspiracy sites I know that there's a lot of them but I've just begun looking into this. Lately my depression has been really bad (suicidal thoughts/self harm - my parents took all of my sharps and know) but I really just don't want other people to go through this. I am my own worst enemy. Anyway thanks for your reply I think that helps a lot.
 
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