Medboard VS Retirement with disability

Bcsemperfi

Registered Member
I am currently less than a year away from my 20 year mark and have been holding out even though the doctors want to medboard me. Is there any benefits with doing one over the other? The doctor is under the impression I would get 100%. Would I not be eligible for benefits you get at 20 years? I was told the board would take between 4-6 months. What does everyone think. Thank you all.
 

RonG

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
I assume you are speaking about 20 good years rather than 20 years active duty such as a regular retiree attains.

One of the major benefits of qualifying for a reserve retirement is Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay (CRDP) which allows military retirees to receive both military retired pay (with some limitations for those initially receiving a disability retirement) and Veterans Affairs (VA) compensation.
A member with 20 good years for RC retirement would not be eligible until reaching the age requirement for reserve retirement.

You must be eligible for retired pay to qualify for CRDP. If you were placed on a disability retirement, but would be eligible for military retired pay in the absence of the disability, you may be entitled to receive CRDP.

Under these rules, you may be entitled to CRDP if…

  • you are a regular retiree with a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater.
  • you are a reserve retiree with 20 qualifying years of service, who has a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater and who has reached retirement age. (In most cases the retirement age for reservists is 60, but certain reserve retirees may be eligible before they turn 60. If you are a member of the Ready Reserve, your retirement age can be reduced below age 60 by three months for each 90 days of active service you have performed during a fiscal year.)
  • you are retired under Temporary Early Retirement Act (TERA) and have a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater.
  • you are a disability retiree who earned entitlement to retired pay under any provision of law other than solely by disability, and you have a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater. You might become eligible for CRDP at the time you would have become eligible for retired pay.
Ron
 

Bcsemperfi

Registered Member
Ron,

Thank you for answering. I was waiting to qualify for the CRDP next year but if I am eligible for 100% disability I noticed I would make more with 100% base pay over 50% retirement with disability on top. I am just not sure if that’s how it works or not. I am just really concerned about making the right choice. Have you seen anyone medboard inside there retirement window instead of retiring? Thank you

Bryan.
 

RonG

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Ron,

Thank you for answering. I was waiting to qualify for the CRDP next year but if I am eligible for 100% disability I noticed I would make more with 100% base pay over 50% retirement with disability on top. I am just not sure if that’s how it works or not. I am just really concerned about making the right choice. Have you seen anyone medboard inside there retirement window instead of retiring? Thank you
Bryan.
You should consider what occurs with the disability retired pay in conjunction with receipt of VA compensation.

1. The DoD might rate you @ 100% for disability retirement, but the maximum payable is 75%.

2. Your disability retirement pay will be reduced dollar for dollar in the amount of VA compensation received.

3. EXAMPLE: Disability retired pay = $2900 and 100% VA Compensation = $3000
$2900 retired pay is completely waived due to the $3K VA Comp = Zero retired pay, but the retiree receives the $3,000 VA compensation

4. Same person, but has qualified for a reserve retirement due to 20 good years: When the retiree meets the age requirement for RC retirement and has a VA rating of >=50%, he/she will receive some or all of the retired pay normally waived. Note: CRDP does not restore the disability portion of retired pay.

5. Another potential benefit is CRSC which does not require 20 years. See https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crsc.html

Ron
 

elsereno19

Registered Member
I have 19yrs and 4 months active time. I am currently in the WTU and am trying to hold off a Medboard in order to get one more Surgery and make it to 20 years of active service. I will have 80 days leave so that means that time is added onto my quest for 20 years. Everyone I talk to says hold on until you can reach 20 but the Medboard question keeps coming up from the docs. I would say keep trying to push it until you can’t no more. One question I do have is when you get medboarded with 20years you qualify for CDRP for 50% no matter what correct. So if my DOD medical retirement is 70%from the Medboard how will that work. Also if it 70%combat unfit related how does that fit in to the equation. Will it be tax free DOD. I am an E7 thanks for the help Battles.
 

RonG

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
I have 19yrs and 4 months active time. I am currently in the WTU and am trying to hold off a One question I do have is when you get medboarded with 20years you qualify for CDRP for 50% no matter what correct. So if my DOD medical retirement is 70%from the Medboard how will that work. Also if it 70%combat unfit related how does that fit in to the equation. Will it be tax free DOD. I am an E7 thanks for the help Battles.
1. If you are speaking about qualifying for a regular retirement (20 years AD) in additional to receiving a medical retirement, the answer is YES, you qualify for CRDP immediately. However, the amount of CRDP will be limited to the dollar amount of the longevity portion of the retired pay. Additionally, any residual (left over) retired pay from the VA offset will reduce the amount of CRDP payable.

2. 70% from medical board:

Retired Pay Formula
All of the retirement plans determine your monthly pay by multiplying your retired pay base by a service percentage:

Retired Pay Base
x Service Percent Multiplier
= Gross Retired Pay

Retired pay base
High-3:
If you entered active or reserve military service after September 7, 1980, your retired pay base is the average of the highest 36 months of basic pay. If you served less than three years, your base will be the average monthly active duty basic pay during your period of service. See disability multiplier info below.

Multiplier

The multiplier for disability retired pay is either:
  • 2.5 percent for each year of service, or
  • disability percentage assigned by the service at the time you retire
2. Your disability retirement pay will be reduced dollar for dollar in the amount of VA compensation received.

3. EXAMPLE, regular retiree with VA award of 50% or more: Disability retired pay = $2900 and 100% VA Compensation = $3000
$2900 retired pay is completely waived due to the $3K VA Comp = Zero retired pay, but the retiree receives the $3,000 VA compensation

If he/she has a VA rating of >=50%, he/she will receive some or all of the retired pay (via CRDP) normally waived. Note: CRDP does not restore the disability portion of retired pay.

4. Another potential benefit is CRSC which does not require 20 years. See https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crsc.html

Ron
 
data-matched-content-ui-type="image_stacked" data-matched-content-rows-num="3" data-matched-content-columns-num="1" data-ad-format="autorelaxed">
Top