Traditional Guard Medical Retirement

Chief175

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Good Day! I'm an ANG Chief preparing to retire after 29 good years of service. I'm retiring because I've sustained a few injuries over the years and I just can't do it anymore. After starting the process I started hearing bits and pieces of info about a medical retirement. I always made the assumption that it wouldn't be worth it for a guardsman. After googling and reading this forum, I'm not so sure.

I'm 49 and I have about 9 years worth of points. I can collect my guard pension at 58 1/2. I also have and 80% VA rating. The service connected injuries are what are preventing me from continuing. The particular injuries that are affecting my performance are a back injury (30%) and knee injury (20%)

My ETS is in May and I plan to retire (transfer to the retired reserve) rather than re-enlist. Should I consider a medical retirement instead? Would it affect my VA disability payments?
 

RonG

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1. If you receive a medical retirement, you would be entitled to retired pay immediately. However, you would waive/lose retired pay in the amount of VA compensation received. You would keep any retired pay that is in excess of the waiver although I suspect that would be zero when considering the percentages you cited.

2. Upon reaching the reserve retirement age, you could receive CRDP which restores the longevity portion of your retirement. You would have to apply for this.

3. VA compensation remains intact. You could be eligible for CRSC in a disability retirement situation IF you have Combat Related disabilities. CRSC replaces some or all of waived retired pay.


4. SMEs will likely discuss other benefits with you.

Ron
 

Chief175

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This was very helpful! It appears that, at best, it would be a wash. I'm happy I asked so that I don't continue to wonder if I made an error.

It's been a good run :) Looking forward to the next chapter! Thank you for your time!
 

chaplaincharlie

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Moneywise it is probably a wash. The value of TFL is immense. Once you hit Medicare age the two together pay most, if not all your medical bill plus you can use the TriCAre pharmacy benefit.
 

Jolly cheese

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Chief,

I am also 49 and a 0-5. I have 18 years of points. I transferred to Guard after 10 years of active duty. I also have a 90% rating from the VA. I was in a plane crash, had a cargo door fall on me, and have Bipolar. I have at least 8 combat deployments.

If you try for a medical retirement in the Guard/Reserve it’s will be the most painful thing you can experience. Some doctor that never deployed will question all of your diagnoses even though they are VA rated.

I’m trying to figure out if it’s worth it. I have never been more embarrassed in my life by the Guard medical. Five years ago I blamed the medical personnel, but today as an 0-5 I understand it’s not their fault. The Guard and Reserve is not funded or manned properly to handle the load of work they have been receiving.
It’s easier not to try for a medical retirement, it’s a tough road, but if we don’t then the system will never get corrected.

My last encounter with my Guard Medical was showing them my VA rating. The Guard doctor wants a letter from the VA explaining the rating. The VA gives ratings out like candy, the ANG want’s a letter from the doctor explaining the rating.

Anyone know how or why I should give my Guard Doctor and explanation of my VA rating?
 

RonG

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LTC,

I was not in the Guard nor do I have a medical background.

However, some thoughts...

Per the VA, ratings are based on:
The evidence you give us (like a doctor’s report or medical test results),
and
The results of your VA claim (C&P) exam (if we determine you need this exam),
and
Other information we may get from other sources (like federal agencies)


38 CFR Book C, Schedule for Rating Disabilities
shows how disabilities are rated. You could use the applicable info to support your case, coupled with the evidence; results of exams, etc. 38 CFR Book C, Schedule for Rating Disabilities - Web Automated Reference Material System <——LINK

Is it worth it? There are considerations other than potential CRSC entitlement, but that would be a major factor for me.

General: Due to relocation, I have had three different family doctors over the past five years. None of them could differentiate the value of PSA numbers for initial PSA and subsequent biopsy confirming prostate cancer and the PSA level, >=0.2, post surgery, that indicates a biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. In other words, their general medical knowledge did not include expertise in the recurrence of prostate cancer (post surgery). It seems you have encountered a similar problem.

Ron
 

Jolly cheese

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Sorry, it’s always better to get the medical retirement but many give up since they get a high VA rating, and the local medical unit “rolls their eyes” because it’s a pain in the rear for them to gather the required documents.

It’s just funny to hand over your VA medical rating and the doctors tells you he needs proof to substantiate the document. Does the VA provide proof of why they service connect what they rated? I understand the medical unit’s questions: neck injury 20%- will it heal? Is it long term? The VA rating does not answer those questions. It’s just frustrating
 

RonG

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Sorry, it’s always better to get the medical retirement but many give up since they get a high VA rating, and the local medical unit “rolls their eyes” because it’s a pain in the rear for them to gather the required documents.
Yes, and in no way was I suggesting otherwise.

In addition to the benefits of a DOD retirement, if there is residual retired pay after the required VA offset (if VA comp is involved), the retiree keeps it. However, the combination of residual retired pay plus CRSC cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.

Good luck,
Ron
 

tony292

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Chief,

I am also 49 and a 0-5. I have 18 years of points. I transferred to Guard after 10 years of active duty. I also have a 90% rating from the VA. I was in a plane crash, had a cargo door fall on me, and have Bipolar. I have at least 8 combat deployments.

If you try for a medical retirement in the Guard/Reserve it’s will be the most painful thing you can experience. Some doctor that never deployed will question all of your diagnoses even though they are VA rated.

I’m trying to figure out if it’s worth it. I have never been more embarrassed in my life by the Guard medical. Five years ago I blamed the medical personnel, but today as an 0-5 I understand it’s not their fault. The Guard and Reserve is not funded or manned properly to handle the load of work they have been receiving.
It’s easier not to try for a medical retirement, it’s a tough road, but if we don’t then the system will never get corrected.

My last encounter with my Guard Medical was showing them my VA rating. The Guard doctor wants a letter from the VA explaining the rating. The VA gives ratings out like candy, the ANG want’s a letter from the doctor explaining the rating.

Anyone know how or why I should give my Guard Doctor and explanation of my VA rating?
I would give the doctor the DBQ that the CP examiner filled out, that in and of itself when compared to the VASRD is the explanation.
 

Jolly cheese

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Is the DBQ part of the VA file you can request in writing from the VA. I know I should get a hold of that VA file but thought I had to wait one year? Part of my VA claim is still open.

I know what the DBQs are but did not receive copies during the C&P exam.

Also I have 27 good years so I am eligible for retirement by age 60.
 

Jolly cheese

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Yes, and in no way was I suggesting otherwise.

In addition to the benefits of a DOD retirement, if there is residual retired pay after the required VA offset (if VA comp is involved), the retiree keeps it. However, the combination of residual retired pay plus CRSC cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.

Good luck,
Ron
Yes, and in no way was I suggesting otherwise.

In addition to the benefits of a DOD retirement, if there is residual retired pay after the required VA offset (if VA comp is involved), the retiree keeps it. However, the combination of residual retired pay plus CRSC cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.

Good luck,
Ron
Ron,

I was the one apologizing Everyone should enter the IDES and fight for your rights.
 

Padgettra

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Good Day! I'm an ANG Chief preparing to retire after 29 good years of service. I'm retiring because I've sustained a few injuries over the years and I just can't do it anymore. After starting the process I started hearing bits and pieces of info about a medical retirement. I always made the assumption that it wouldn't be worth it for a guardsman. After googling and reading this forum, I'm not so sure.

I'm 49 and I have about 9 years worth of points. I can collect my guard pension at 58 1/2. I also have and 80% VA rating. The service connected injuries are what are preventing me from continuing. The particular injuries that are affecting my performance are a back injury (30%) and knee injury (20%)

My ETS is in May and I plan to retire (transfer to the retired reserve) rather than re-enlist. Should I consider a medical retirement instead? Would it affect my VA disability payments?
Chief175, the medical retirement is worth the bureaucratic paperwork in my opinion just for the immediate retirement and the Tricare coverage. Even if your basic pay does not generate and retirement residual from DFAS the Tricare is worth the medical process. Best regards and hope it all works out for you. Go ANG! Ron P
 
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