When the VA codes your unfitting diagnosis incorrectly

Meg H.

New Member
Registered Member
I am currently in the thick of PEB process for the unfitting diagnosis of a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm. When I received my iPEB results I found that the VA misspelled my diagnosis and then coded it as Angioneurotic edema. I never have been diagnosed, claimed or have been evaluated for Angioneurotic Edema. In fact, I had to look up what it was. Being that the Aortic Aneurysm is why I am being boarded after almost 9 years of service and this miscoding lead to a 0% rating from the AF with medical separation, I have to fight this paperwork error. Has anyone else had this happen? How did it get fixed? Thank you in advance for any responses.
 

Guardguy11

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Are you in your 6-day response window? Definitely consult the OAC or a personal lawyer ASAP. You will want to file a VARR request and start the appeal process.
 

Meg H.

New Member
Registered Member
Are you in your 6-day response window? Definitely consult the OAC or a personal lawyer ASAP. You will want to file a VARR request and start the appeal process.
I am in my 6-day. I have consulted with my OAC lawyer and we are going to try the VARR. My fear is the VA may try to reject the request and then what? I was told that to appeal to SecAF that there is certain criteria you have to meet. Can they separate members from the service without having the coding for thier service connected, unfitting diagnosis being incorrect?
 

Guardguy11

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I pulled this off military disability made easy.
An aneurysm occurs when an artery swells to 1.5 or more times its normal size. It is usually a sign of weakness in the tissues of the artery.
Code 7110: If an aneurysm in the aortic artery is corrected by surgery, then it is rated 100% from the day of admittance to the hospital. This rating continues for the first 6 months after discharge from the hospital. The condition is then reevaluated and rated accordingly. If the condition is active and causes symptoms such as pain or hemorrhaging, or if it is 5 centimeters or larger in diameter, then it is rated 100%. If the condition is serious enough that you cannot perform moderately strenuous activities (lifting weights or running), then it is rated 60%. If the condition does not qualify for these ratings, then it is rated based on the existing symptoms in the affected organ (e.g. if it caused erratic heart beats, then it would be rated as arrhythmia).

I doubt they did an analogous rating when there is a direct code for your condition. When you point this out, I doubt they will be able to fight it.
 
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