Issues with VA's Progress One Year Since Enactment of the Historic Law

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ALL- thought would post here from PBEForum Thread- Forums Transition Forum: Veterans Affairs and SSDI Veterans Affairs, SSDI, and other Benefits VA News Feeds Appeals Modernization: VA's Progress One Year Since Enactment of the Historic Law” Thread starter Physical Evaluation Board Forum Start date Thursday at 6:52 PM see below from link in Thread:

Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs- Appeals Modernization: VA’s Progress One Year Since Enactment of the Historic LawAugust 23, 2018, 05:52:00 PM Printable Version Need Viewer Software? For example only at web-address: https://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/pressrelease.cfm?id=5098 accessed on 26 AUG 2018, appx. 01009 AM EDT and below cited/ copied in full, from above web-address in “italics”:

“Appeals Modernization: VA’s Progress One Year Since Enactment of the Historic Law
WASHINGTON
— Today marks one year since President Donald J. Trump signed into law one of the most significant statutory changes in decades to affect the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Veterans it serves.
The Veterans Appeals Improvement and Modernization Act of 2017 (Appeals Modernization Act) was signed Aug. 23, 2017, aimed at transforming a complex, frustrating appeals process into one that is simple, timely and transparent.
“Before reform, Veterans experienced a complicated appeals system that was buried in several layers of law,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “The Appeals Modernization Act has since allowed VA, with the help of our partners, to design a new process that offers greater choice to Veterans and faster decisions from VA.”
Today, VA is working toward full implementation of the law, scheduled to take effect in February 2019. The new system features three differentiated lanes from which a claimant may choose in seeking review of a VA denial (or partial denial):

  • Higher-level review;
  • Supplemental claim;
  • Appeal to the Board of Veterans’ Appeals (BVA) --.
Veterans are already benefitting from the new process. In November 2017, VA began the Rapid Appeals Modernization Program (RAMP). RAMP allows Veterans with an eligible, active appeal to choose between two of the three new lanes now. Implementation of BVA’s appeals lane for Veterans who have appealed their RAMP decision by VBA is expected to begin in October 2018.
To date, more than 40,000 Veterans have chosen RAMP, and more than $45 million in retroactive benefits has been paid to Veterans. Additionally, BVA has issued more than 73,000 decisions thus far in fiscal year 2018, a historic high, and is on track to deliver over 81,000 decisions to Veterans by the end of the fiscal year.
For more information about VA’s appeals modernization process, go to https://benefits.va.gov/benefits/appeals.asp.”


While, the “intent” of this law is very good for US Veterans, do not see it being “implemented” IMO the manner intended as per usual with US DVA…….
Once again know “local” Alabama Veteran whom called the US DVA Veterans Board of Appeals twice supposedly at Phone # 800-923-8387, and not only received “unsatisfactory” answers from phone “agents” but also was told a Veterans Board of Appeals Judge had both of their “issues” in hand and was working them. Come to find out, supposedly both issues were in fact split up by a “stand-in judge” one was decided apparently within days of phone call, mailed the same day as “stand-in” judge rendered decision”- “denial” of course- and received in LA- “Lower Alabama” by said veteran less than 48-hours later by US Postal Service Delivery, which never happens- more often than not takes a week-two weeks via USPS from the Mid-Atlantic Region of US for some reason…. Very strange indeed????? Furthermore, second issue “stand-in” judge was supposedly working- which along with one mentioned above- were supposed to be VTC Hearings with a Veterans Law Judge, and per a phone call, again this week, second issue is now supposed to take per “phone agent” quite a long time……. To simply get a hearing via VTC…. Very strange once again indeed…..??????

Bottom-line: both issues were supposed to be decided VTC Hearing with Veterans Law Judge… first issue decided had already been before a Veteran’s Law Judge and remanded by to US DVA Montgomery AL Regional Office in Montgomery, Alabama, and sent back to Board of Veterans Appeals…. Which took years- only for a denial by a “stand-in” judge, then issues once again split up, and second issue now not even on “docket” when veteran was told “stand-in” judge was reviewing both…..

Resultant, Veteran, was supposedly “legally” advised simply let first issue go- i.e. pursue no further… and no telling now when or if second issue will in fact ever be decided…… humph….is this “satisfactory” to anyone…. Given all listed “anomalies”????????

Additionally, per PEBForum Thread- Forums Transition Forum: Veterans Affairs and SSDI Veterans Affairs, SSDI, and other Benefits VA News Feeds VA, Walgreens collaborate to improve care coordination for Veterans” Thread starter Physical Evaluation Board Forum Start date Aug 17, 2018
( Might also want to see PEBForum Thread- Forums Resources and Files Department of Defense Regulations Express Scripts Issue's Fexofinidene (allegria) -All Vet's Retirees Out There-Question?????”)

Another local “Fairhope Alabama” veteran, whom supposedly had nothing but issues Walgreens Pharmacy in Fairhope, AL, in fact had local Walgreens – claim- some medication- that was over counter- could not be filled with Express Scripts by TRICARE, as was simply “over” daily allocation- allowed. Veteran, supposedly, ended up having to call their local “physician” staff numerous times as well as Express Scripts by Tricare to get issue resolved- causing much consternation amongst prescribing “physicians” staff, etc…. as well as finding out that Walgreens “created” a problem for no reason, and even “quoted” wrong price of medications as well as “prescribing rule” per “Express Scripts Tricare” phone “agent” themselves as well as Walgreens Pharmacist’s themselves not knowing to call 800-922-1557 to resolve any issues themselves- veteran supposedly had to tell Walgreens to do this…..

Is this acceptable to anyone…… whom may read this……???????

As one can see, hopefully, it is “great” law-makers in US have US Veterans Issues at heart, but simply “passing” rules and regulations without any follow-up or “appropriate” oversight really does not amount to much of anything…. IMO… and if not mistaken “whole lot media” about Federal Agencies simply doing as they please despite wishes and “laws” passed by US elected officials…..??????

Hopefully, some day this issue will in fact be fixed……….

Well, ALL- hope this Thread/Post helps one other veteran or their family out there……??????

PS: Might want to see below, for, reference-consideration-thought- only, on what our “US Founding Father’s” thought about a lot of this and or other issues:

The Writings of Thomas Payne-Volume 1. 1774-1779” by “G.P. Putman’s Sons New York & London The Knickerbocker Press” for example only from web-address: https://www.law.gmu.edu/assets/files/academics/founders/Paine_CommonSense.pdf accessed 26 AUG 2018 appx. 0136 AM EDT (see attached file downloaded from above listed web-address- “Paine_CommonSense.pdf”)

Rights of Man Part The First Being An Answer To Mr. Burke’s Attack On The French Revolution” by Thomas Paine for example only at web-address: https://www.ucc.ie/archive/hdsp/Paine_Rights_of_Man.pdf accessed 25 AUG 2018 appx. 0056 AM EDT (see attached file downloaded from above listed web-address- “Paine_Rights_of_Man.pdf”)

THE FEDERALIST PAPERS” Edited by Bill Bailey “The Federalist Papers Project-www.thefederalistpapers.org” for example only at web-address: https://www.thefederalistpapers.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/The-Complete-Federalist-Papers.pdf accessed on 26 AUG 2018 appx 0101 AM EDT (see attached file downloaded from above listed web-address- “The-Complete-Federalist-Papers.pdf”)

ANYONE ELES HAVING CONSISTANT ISSUES THIS WEBSITE…..????????
 

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oddpedestrian

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RAMP is great but I see serious abuse in the future allowing vets to constantly switch from supplemental to higher review endlessly is a mistake they should only allow two elections for the same claim after that you get pushed to the BVA, I have seen reconsiderations badly abused people filing it five times which is ridiculous, of course, some selfish people say to get whats yours but if you have to file more than one reconsideration then you should be put in the back of the line its also your responsibility to ensure your claim is accurate, up to date and ready to be rated.
 

Former MiTT Team Leader

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oddpedestrian- ststed from above Post# 2 "RAMP is great but I see serious abuse in the future allowing vets to constantly switch from supplemental to higher review endlessly is a mistake they should only allow two elections for the same claim after that you get pushed to the BVA, I have seen reconsiderations badly abused people filing it five times which is ridiculous, of course, some selfish people say to get whats yours but if you have to file more than one reconsideration then you should be put in the back of the line its also your responsibility to ensure your claim is accurate, up to date and ready to be rated."

oddpedestrian- ALL-( if let me quote-did not)), in concept agree with your comments, however in case of “Veteran” in above post it is very strange as both US DVA personnel as well as “former” US DVA personnel agreed that US DVA judge in “first” instance had more than enough “evidence” and “cause” to render “affirmative” decision’s on “issue’s” REMANDED… it is simply as if US DVA “bolstering” statistics by REMANDING and or potentially other things as a former Gulf Coast VA “Patient Advocate” used to warn “Veterans” – at P-COLA, FL location, about hiring an “attorney” to represent them with US DVA “benefits” Division….….etc….

So until, the US DVA either gets “streamlined”- “revamped”- etc…or forced to actually comply with wishes of US Lawmakers and not “mis-interpreting” or “making” own rules- IMO - not much change in sight as far as I can tell…????????

Thank you- greatly- your “informed” reply as always appreciated……..

PS: Might want to see below and your “thoughts” comments as well anyone else would be “appreciated” once again……???????????
PEBForum: Forums Transition Forum: Veterans Affairs and SSDI Veterans Affairs, SSDI, and other Benefits VA News Feeds VA Releases State-level Veteran Suicide Data, National Strategy for Preventing Veteran Suicide”

Critical Issues Facing Veterans and Military Families-SAMHSA addresses critical issues such as suicide risk, trauma, and homelessness that impact members of the military with behavioral health conditions.” For example only by “Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration-SAMHSA” at web-address: https://www.samhsa.gov/veterans-military-families/critical-issues accessed on 27 AUG 2018 appx. 0426 AM EDT below article and attached pdf file from this web-site:

----“Suicide Rates in VHA Patients through 2011 with Comparisons with Other Americans and other Veterans through 2010” by Janet E. Kemp, RN, PhD Veterans Health Administration January 2014 for example only at web-address: https://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/docs/Suicide_Data_Report_Update_January_2014.pdf accessed on 27 AUG 2018 appx. 0421 AM EDT (please see attached file downloaded from above listed web-address” “Suicide_Data_Report_Update_January_2014.pdf”)
Might also want see https://www.samhsa.gov/ SAMHSA Home Page……...????

Troubling Veteran Mental Health Facts and Statistics that Need to be AddressedBy National Veterans Foundation March 25, 2016 for example only at web-address: https://nvf.org/veteran-mental-health-facts-statistics/ accessed 27 AUG 2018 appx. 04330 AM EDT

VA » Health Care » Public Health » Diseases & Conditions Public Health Diseases & Conditionsfor example only at web-address: https://www.publichealth.va.gov/diseases-conditions.asp accessed on 27 AUG 2018 appx. 04332 AM EDT

VA » Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs » News Releases - Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs- News Releases” for example only at web-address: https://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/ accessed on 27 AUG 2018 appx. 04334 AM EDT

VA » Health Care » Mental Health » About VA Mental Health -Mental Health” for example only at web-address: https://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/VAMentalHealthGroup.asp accessed on 27 AUG 2018 appx. 0437 AM EDT and below in “italics” quoted-copied directly above listed US DVA web-address:

“VA's Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Guidebook
VA provides a continuum of forward-looking outpatient, residential, and inpatient mental health services across the country. Points of access to care span VA medical centers, Community Based Outpatient Clinics, Vet Centers, and mobile Vet Centers. This guidebook highlights information on the range of VA mental health services and related programs designed to address the mental health needs to Veterans and their families. See the comprehensive guidebook here.
Additional and updated information regarding suicide prevention can be found here: https://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/suicide_prevention/Suicide-Prevention-Data.asp

Guiding Principles The Guide to VA Mental Health Services for Veterans and Families (also available in Spanish : Guia de Servicios de Salud Mental que el Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos Ofrece a los Veteranos y sus Familias) is intended for Veterans, Veteran family members, members of Veterans Services Organizations, or members of other groups interested in VA mental health care. You can use this handbook to learn what mental health services your local or regional VA health care facility has pledged to provide to Veterans.

The following information has been pulled from the guide, and is intended to serve as a brief overview. Please see the Guide for more detailed information.

  • Focus on Recovery - Recovery empowers the Veteran to take charge of his/her treatment and live a full and meaningful life. This approach focuses on the individual’s strengths and gives respect, honor, and hope to our nation’s heroes and their families.
  • Coordinated Care for the Whole Person - VA health care providers coordinate with each other to provide safe and effective treatment for the whole person—head to toe. Having a healthy body, satisfying work, and supportive family and friends, along with getting appropriate nutrition and exercising regularly, are just as important to mental health as to physical health.
  • Mental Health Treatment in Primary Care - Primary Care clinics use Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACTs) to provide the Veteran’s healthcare. A PACT is a medical team that includes mental health experts.
  • Mental Health Treatment Coordinator - Veterans who receive specialty mental health care have a Mental Health Treatment Coordinator (MHTC). The MHTC’s job is to understand the overall mental health goals of the Veteran.
  • Around-the-Clock Service - Emergency mental health care is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week at VA medical centers. If your VA does not have a 24-hour emergency room, it must provide these services through a local, non-VA hospital. Telephone evaluations at VA medical centers and the national crisis hotline are also available 24/7.
  • Care that is Sensitive to Gender & Cultural Issues - VA health care providers receive training about military culture, gender differences, and ethnic issues in order to better understand each Veteran.
  • Care Close to Home - VA is moving closer to where Veterans live by adding more rural and mobile clinics and working with other health care providers in the community.
  • Evidence-Based Treatment - Evidence-based treatments are treatments that research has proven are effective for particular problems. Mental health providers receive training on a wide variety of proven treatments. Mental health providers must offer evidence-based treatments to Veterans.”
  • Family & Couple Services - Sometimes, as part of a Veteran’s treatment, some members of the Veteran’s immediate family or the Veteran’s legal guardian may be included and receive services, such as family therapy, marriage counseling, grief counseling, etc.
VA » Health Care » Patient Care Services » PCS » Mental Health Services Patient Care Servicesfor example only at web-address: https://www.patientcare.va.gov/mentalhealth.asp accessed on 27 AUG 2018 appx. 0437 AM EDT and below in “italics” quoted-copied directly above listed US DVA web-address:

“Mental Health Services-Office of Mental Health Services-The Office of Mental Health Services is the national program office that sets program and policy guidance for mental health services provided throughout VHA.
The Office of Mental Health Services aims to insure that all veterans have access to needed mental health care. VA Mental Health advances the principle that mental health care is an essential component of overall health care and promote mental health recovery. The internet site is intended to serve veterans, their family members, mental health clinicians, VA staff, affiliated mental health associations and the community, providing information about mental health conditions and services.
Mental Health Services site

Centers of Excellence
The Centers of Excellence were established by Congress in 2006 with the goal of researching the causes and treatments of mental disorders and using the dissemination of education to put new knowledge into routine clinical practice in the VA. There are currently three OMHS Centers of Excellence which are funded by Mental Health Enhancement Initiative processes. These Centers will migrate to OMHS budgeted funding effective FY10.
Each COE has a focus (e.g., mental health disorders and delivery of best practices treatment) and theme (e.g., determining risk and resilience factors of PTSD; delivery of PTSD care/treatment; and suicide prevention) under the larger COE mission. In general, the COEs have research, clinical improvement, educational and training, bioethics and security information, and business process programs to deliver these services.

Community Homelessness Assessment, Local Education and Networking Groups (CHALENG)
Project CHALENG (Community Homelessness Assessment, Local Education and Networking Groups) for Veterans, an innovative program designed to enhance the continuum of care for homeless Veterans provided by the local VA and its surrounding community service agencies.
Project CHALENG site

Community Living Center (CLC)
The Community Living Center (CLC) Mental Health Program provides for the integration of mental health services in the CLC setting. This program provides guidance and oversight for the integration of mental health providers in VA CLC. The CLC Mental Health Provider provides assessment, treatment, and team-focused services, with an emphasis on promoting psychosocial behavior management services and culture transformation in VA CLCs.
Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV)
  • The Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) Program: conducts outreach to identify homeless Veterans who are eligible for VA healthcare and assist these Veterans in accessing appropriate levels of care. In addition, HCHV also contracts with community-based programs to provide residential treatment for homeless Veterans.Health Care Information for Veterans site
  • The Homeless and Residential Rehabilitation and Treatment Programs: offer a wide array of special programs and initiatives specifically designed to help homeless veterans live as self-sufficiently and independently as possible. Recognizing that the vast majority of homeless veterans suffer from serious medical and mental illnesses, including substance use disorders, VA's clinical staff in medical centers across the country provide direct health care services to homeless veterans. VA's homeless-specific programs constitute the largest integrated network of homeless treatment and assistance services in the country. Homeless Veterans site
  • The Veterans Justice Outreach (VJO) Program: provides timely access to VA services for eligible justice-involved Veterans to avoid unnecessary criminalization and incarceration of Veteran offenders with mental illness. This is done through direct outreach to Veterans in contact with the justice system through encounters with police, jails, and courts. Veterans Justice Outreach (VJO) Program site
  • The Healthcare Reentry Veterans (HCRV) Program: promotes successful community integration of reentry Veterans by conducting outreach to vulnerable Veterans, while they are incarcerated, to engage them in treatment and rehabilitation programs that will assist in preventing their homelessness, readjusting to community life, and desisting from commission of new crimes or parole or probation violations. Healthcare Reentry Veterans (HCRV) Program site
  • The Grant and Per Diem (GPD) Program: assists eligible entities in establishing new community-based programs to furnish outreach, supportive services, and transitional housing to homeless Veterans. The goal is to create and help maintain supportive housing and services centers in partnership with non-profit organizations or state and local government agencies to assist homeless Veterans and their families. Grant and Per Diem (GPD) Program site
Home-Based Primary Care (HBPC)
The Home-Based Primary Care (HBPC) Mental Health Program provides for the integration of a full range of mental health services on each VA HBPC team. Each HBPC team has a full-time HBPC Mental Health Provider who serves as a core member of the team, providing evidence-based cognitive and psychological assessment, psychological intervention services, and services for family caregivers of HBPC patients to promote the well-being and management of Veterans in their homes.
Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH)
The Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) Program combines VHA case management with permanent supportive housing (though HUD "Housing Choice" Vouchers) to address the needs of Veterans and their families who are homeless. The program is recovery based and is a key strategy in VA efforts to end homelessness among Veterans. Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) Program site
Mental Health Intensive Case Management (MHICM)
This is an intensive interdisciplinary team approach to the management and treatment of Veterans with SMI in the community and coordinated with a range of VA and community services. The hallmarks of the program include very frequent contacts between the staff and Veteran, a flexible approach with most contacts occurring in the community, a focus on rehabilitation, and a clear pathway of responsibility with a minimum of one year of continuous involvement.
Mental Health Rehabilitation and Residential Treatment Program (MHRRTP)
The Mental Health Rehabilitation and Residential Treatment Program (MHRRTP) provides state-of-the-art, high-quality residential rehabilitation and treatment services for Veterans with multiple and severe medical conditions, mental illness, addiction, or psychosocial deficits. The MH RRTP identifies and addresses goals of rehabilitation, recovery, health maintenance, improved quality of life, and community integration in addition to specific treatment of medical conditions, mental illnesses, addictive disorders, and homelessness. Homeless Programs site
Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECC)
The Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECC) were established by Congress with the goal of researching the causes and treatments of mental disorders and using education to quickly put new knowledge into routine clinical practice in the VA. There are currently 10 MIRECCs.
Each MIRECC has a different focus (e.g., a clinical disorder, improve functioning) and approach (e.g., genetics, health services) under the larger MIRECC mission. In general, the MIRECCs have research programs, clinical improvement programs, and educational and training programs. MIRECC site

  • New England MIRECC - VISN 1
    • Dual Diagnosis: veterans with mental illness in combination with addiction problems
  • Center for Integrated Healthcare - VISN 2
    • Integrating mental health services into the primary care setting
  • Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention - VISN 2
    • Reduce the morbidity and mortality in Veterans due to suicidal behavior
  • VISN 3 MIRECC
    • The focus is on maximizing recovery for veterans with Serious Mental Illnesses (SMI)
  • VISN 4 MIRECC
    • Focus on co-morbidity—the co-occurrence of mental health disorders with either general medical, mental health, and/or substance use disorders.
  • VA Capitol Health Care Network MIRECC - VISN 5
    • Improve the care of all Veterans with schizophrenia and other Serious Mental Illnesses
  • Mid-Atlantic MIRECC - VISN 6
    • Overarching goal is the clinical assessment and treatment of post-deployment mental illness and related problems
  • South Central MIRECC - VISN 16
    • Improve access to evidence-based practices in rural and other under-served populations
  • VISN 17 Center of Excellence (COE) for Research on Returning War Veterans
    • Focus on mental health issues in returning war Veterans (OEF/OIF/OND)
  • Rocky Mountain Network MIRECC - VISN 19
    • To study suicide with the goal of reducing suicide in the veteran population
  • Northwest MIRECC - VISN 20
    • Applies genetic, neurobiologic and clinical trial methods to the discovery of effective treatments for major mental disorders
  • Sierra Pacific MIRECC - VISN 21
    • To improve the clinical care for veterans with dementias and with PTSD
  • Desert Pacific MIRECC - VISN 22
    • To improve the outcome of patients with chronic psychotic mental disorders (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and psychotic mood disorders)
  • VISN 22 Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health - CESAMH
    • To be a national resource for cutting-edge understanding and state-of-the-art treatment of stress- and trauma-related problems
Primary Care - Mental Health Integrated Care Program
The Primary Care-Mental Health Integration Program advances VHA progress in providing primary care patients with availability of integrated services.
Primary Care-Mental Health Integrated Care Program provides evidence-based mental health care, either on site or remotely, in primary care settings. They are designed to:

  • Promote effective treatment of common mental health conditions in the primary care environment (depression, problem drinking, anxiety, PTSD screening)
  • Integrate care for physical and mental health in one setting
  • Allow mental health specialists to focus on patients with more severe illnesses
  • Promote patient engagement and adherence
  • Avoid stigmatization and fragmentation of care
  • Decrease risk of suicide attempts and deaths
Primary Care - Mental Health Integrated Care Program site
Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery
VA has defined recovery as a journey of healing and transformation enabling Veterans with a mental health condition to live a meaningful life in their community of choice while striving to achieve their full potential. In order to support the rehabilitation and recovery of every Veteran with a mental illness, VA has identified recovery as a guiding principle for its entire mental health service delivery system.
Mental Health Recovery site

  • The Local Recovery Coordinator: at each VAMC advocates for the recovery of all Veterans with mental illness, especially those with a serious mental illness and ensures access to and coordination of recovery oriented services. The LRC provides education and support to Veterans, family members, and VA staff members about mental illness and recovery and works to remove any barriers and stigma associated with mental illness.
  • Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Services: Peer Support technicians - are individuals trained to help others with serious mental illness identify and achieve specific life and recovery goals. Many current peer support providers are OIF/OEF Veterans.

    They assist Veterans with goal setting, problem solving, symptom management skills using a variety of recovery tools. They aim to empower Veterans by helping them identify their strengths, supports, resources, and skills. They advocate on behalf of Veterans in order to eliminate the stigma of mental illness. They identify social supports in the community that promote the integration of Veterans with mental illness into their local communities, and encourage the further expansion of local community resources. While accomplishing these tasks, peer support technicians create the vital element of hope in the Veterans they serve.
  • Peer Counseling: All VAMCs and very large VA clinics must provide counseling from peer support technicians for veterans treated for SMI when this service is clinically indicated and included in the treatment plan. Peer Support technicians serve as role models to Veterans by sharing their personal recovery experiences while they teach and demonstrate skills that facilitate recovery.
  • Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center (PRRC): A PRRC is a transitional educational center that inspires and assists Veterans to reclaim their lives by instilling hope, validating strengths, teaching skills, and facilitating community integration so Veterans can attain meaningful self-determined roles in the community. A PRRC offers an array of services five days a week for veterans with SMI and significant functional impairment. PRRC site
  • Psychosocial Rehab and Recovery:Family Outreach--Partnering with families, with the Veteran's consent is an essential component to VA mental health services. Research consistently demonstrates that Veterans with mental health disorders experience improved outcomes when families are active participants in their clinical care. Family services may include consultation, professional counseling, marriage and family counseling, training/education and mental health services as needed in connection with the Veteran's treatment plan.

    Consistent with a recovery philosophy, flexibility is a key principle when involving families in care. Services must be tailored to the Veteran's phase of illness, symptom level, self-sufficiency, family cancellation, and preferences. A graduated continuum of services are necessary to meet these varied needs and range from engaging the family, to family education and facilitating access to the treatment team, to family involvement in treatment planning, to ongoing, low intensity, problem-focused family consultation, to intensive marriage and family counseling/therapy.
  • Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Services: Veterans Mental Health Council (VMHC): is a group of Veteran mental health consumers, Veteran family members and other relevant stakeholders who provide input into VA mental health services. At least one VA staff acts as a liaison to the VMHC, to assist the Council and facilitate communication between the VMHC and local VA MH leadership. VMHC's facilitate Veteran input, provide a vehicle for sharing information between Veterans and the local VA, promote greater understanding of and collaboration with Veterans and VA and promote understanding and use of VA MH services by all Veteran and their families.

    VMHCs form a positive working relationship with the local VA Medical Center, forming a true partnership and engaging in open dialogue with VA, for the continued improvement of VA mental health services. VMHC's can assist the local VA with many projects such as assistance with MIAW, Stand downs, outreach to vulnerable Veteran populations (homeless, OEF/OIF) and many others.
  • CWT Transitional and Supported Employment: utilize work-based treatment to facilitate and strengthen vocational rehabilitation potential and to provide a continuum of employment support services including: vocational assistance, job skill development, job placement, and supportive job follow-up services.
  • Transitional Work Experience (TWE) and Supported Employment (SE): Each VAMC must offer TWE and SE services for veterans who have occupational dysfunction resulting from a mental health condition or a co-occurring physical disability including SMI and who would benefit from this program. Transitional Work Experience (TWE) and Supported Employment (SE) site
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
The PTSD Section coordinates PTSD clinical programs across the VA system in collaboration with other program offices such as Readjustment Counseling Service and the Poly Trauma section of Rehabilitation Service.
The National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD) was created in 1989 within the Department of Veterans Affairs in response to a Congressional mandate (PL 98-528) to address the needs of veterans with military-related posttraumatic stress disorder.
NCPTSD supports the clinical care and social welfare of America's veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.
Services for Returning Veterans-Mental Health (SeRV-MH) teams, also known as Mental Health Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) teams, have been established across the VA system since 2005. These programs focus on early identification and management of stress related disorders and may decrease the long term disease burden on returning troops. Since Fiscal Year (FY) 2005, 93 SeRV-MH Teams have been established across the VA system. PTSD site

Services for Returning Veterans-Mental Health (SeRV-MH)
Services for Returning Veterans-Mental Health (SeRV-MH) teams, also known as Mental Health Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) teams, have been established across the VA system since 2005. These programs focus on early identification and management of stress related disorders and may decrease the long term disease burden on returning troops. Since Fiscal Year (FY) 2005, 93 SeRV-MH Teams have been established across the VA system. Services for Returning Veterans-Mental Health (SeRV-MH) site
Substance Use Disorders
VHA's Substance Use Disorders program is to provides effective, safe, and compassionate treatment to Veterans with substance use disorders. Substance Use Disorder care may be offered in specific clinics or in primary health care or mental health services.
VA facilities screen for alcohol problems at least annually and for other drug problems on an as-indicated basis. Treatment includes medical detoxification and stabilization, intensive outpatient rehabilitation, residential treatment with a substance use disorder track, medications to assist recovery, and care integrated with Primary Care and other specialty needs including PTSD. Psychosocial and other proven treatments are available. Substance Use Disorders site

Suicide Prevention
The Suicide Prevention Program is based on the premise that ready access to high quality mental health services as well as programs designed to address suicide directly is important. A "knowledge bank" has been developed and designed to provide information about VA Mental Health services, access to the Suicide Prevention Hotline, and on-line access to a VA counselor via Veterans Chat.
Suicide Prevention Teams at each VA facility and largest Community Based Clinics provide access services as well as monitor and track high risk patients in order to assure that an enhanced level of care will be provided. Both the VA Suicide Prevention Hotline and Veterans Chat provide immediate access to a VA counselor and referrals to local sites for care. Suicide Prevention site

VA Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Training Programs
VA Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Training Programs - VA is strongly committed to making state-of-the-art, evidence-based psychological treatments widely available to veterans. To stimulate efforts to make these treatments widely available throughout VHA, the Office of Mental Health Services has developed national initiatives to train VA mental health staff in the delivery of evidence-based psychotherapies for PTSD, depression, and serious mental illness, which are actively underway.
The Local Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Coordinator supports the local implementation and sustainability of evidence-based psychotherapies. Each medical center has a designated Local Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Coordinator who serves as a champion for EBPs at the local level, providing clinical support and education and promoting local systems and administrative structures to facilitate the implementation of EBPs on the ground.

VA Training for College and University Staff
  • Provides university and college campus counseling staff with information about unique challenges that veterans face in adjusting to college after deployment in war
  • Provides information about common mental health issues for veteran students and how to link them up with resources to help with coping and adjustment to the college experience
VA Training for College and University Staff site


PEBForum: Forums Transition Forum: Veterans Affairs and SSDI Veterans Affairs, SSDI, and other Benefits VA Benefits VA Prescriptions and Experiences” +++ “The Pledge of Allegiance” from “U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs , Washington, D.C. 20420” for example only at web-address: https://www.va.gov/opa/publications/celebrate/pledge.pdf accessed on 26 AUG 2018 appx. 0316 AM EDT (see attached file downloaded above web-address- “pledge.pdf” as well as Image - "Presentation- US DVA- US Pledge of Allegiance- 27 AUG 2018_001" created from above listed web-adddress as well)
Presentation- US DVA- US Pledge of Allegiance- 27 AUG 2018_001.jpg
[Posted as know US Officer Veteran told me story that years ago they were “embarrassed” as asked to receipt the pledge in fort of an audience in uniform, while on active duty, and simply had not said it in so long had forgotten some of it…. Perhaps, other “VETs” or those “still active duty” same boat…so thought would post as potential resource….]

STILL ISSUES THIS WEB_SITE, ETC>>>>ANYONE ELSE????!!????
 

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Former MiTT Team Leader

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RAMP is great but I see serious abuse in the future allowing vets to constantly switch from supplemental to higher review endlessly is a mistake they should only allow two elections for the same claim after that you get pushed to the BVA, I have seen reconsiderations badly abused people filing it five times which is ridiculous, of course, some selfish people say to get whats yours but if you have to file more than one reconsideration then you should be put in the back of the line its also your responsibility to ensure your claim is accurate, up to date and ready to be rated.
Oddpedestrian- thought would follow up here, as believe to some degree, might be perhaps- correct- per above. Know local "LA" vet that has spoken numerous other vets' from all "conflicts" and IMO there is "animosity" between "year-groups"- so to speak- i.e. WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and Gulf War, etc..- as some, for example only- Vitenam Vet's, watching 18- 24 year "old" former soldiers, whom only served 2-3 years military, get their "claims" approved very rapidly v. their "Vietnam-cohort" as well as- per another thread- 20(+/-) percent "gulf War" not working nor actively seeking an education, due to being rated TDIU, 100% Disabled, with 4-5 (+/-) physical conditions as well perhaps a MH Condition..etc....????

So one could- hopefully- see where some "serious" anmonsity would come into play on a rather "large" scale here! Simply, "Not judging" but might simply be correct to some degree as per "enlistment" criteria, which admittedly shifts time of War and "volunteer" force, but not to that large a degree, there should be no reason that there "should exist" a "large" statistical population of 18-25 year olds with this many "service-connected" conditions, no matter US DVA "system" improvements in claims processing, etc.... as "one" is supposed to be in pretty much "above" average physical and mental health prior to "enlistment!" So unless, shot, "blown-up" or significantly injured in training, it stands to reason this should not be the case, vs. say a NCO or other soldiers whom served not only "combat" but 10-20 years active or "deployed-federalized" National Guard!

Oddpedestrian- once again thanks, and, I "disagree" with what some others have stated, "that" folks will "self correct", as long as there is a "carrot" and no stick, attached to it, and this if "US DVA" statics correct...perhaps this is an issue that needs to be seriously looked into alon lines recent US DVA Survey sent out asking if US DVA MH Professionals' "encouraging" veterans to "work".....IMO....????? (sometimes leadership by example, through encouragement, etc... simply does not work, especially if "not" one holding all the cards...)

Anyone else issues this web-site..........????????
 
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